Joyless parents: You're doing it wrong – Parenting – Salon.com

Love this quote, re: parenting:

It’s a humbling, daunting, awesome experience — and it’s hard enough without the added pressure of making every moment enriching and significant.

My kids make me happier, that’s for sure. And maybe part of that is because I think of parenting as a gift (and a responsibility), not a job. I’ve already got one of those.

I’m not going to beat myself up because Lulu’s not enrolled in little midget dance class or we can’t afford to send Kieran to space camp. I’m also not going to work three jobs to make those things happen. I’ll sell an amp and a couple of guitars when we need to buy a new heat pump, but that’s another mattter.

Also, I love my kids and my life. There have been times when I’ve loved my kids a little less (like when Lulu’s throwing a fit and Kieran isn’t listening to a thing I say), and my life a little less (when a student is throwing a fit and my boss isn’t listening to a thing I say) but 99.9% of the time, it’s all good. I’m pretty sure my wife feels the same way, and I guess I’m lucky.

Or at least reading about these sad, wealthy white people makes me feel lucky. And isn’t that what matters?

via Joyless parents: You’re doing it wrong – Parenting – Salon.com.

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About russellwriter

Rob Russell is a dad, husband, writer, musician, educator, comic book reader, bad solderer, pop culture junky, trivia buff and student of everything cool and uncool. His favorite records are Bob Dylan's Blonde on Blonde and, currently, The Best of Bobbie Gentry: The Capitol Years. His favorite comic books are Kurt Busiek's Astro City and Neil Gaiman's Sandman. His favorite literary novels are Gabrial Garcia Marquez's 100 Years of Solitude and William Faulkner's As I Lay Dying. His favorite genre novels are John Scalzi's Red Shirts, M.R. Carrey's The Girl with All the Gifts, and Dan Simmons' Drood. His favorite movie is Goodfellas. His favorite hobby, besides everything, is writing about himself and his favorite things in the third person.

Posted on July 7, 2010, in Parenthood. Bookmark the permalink. 6 Comments.

  1. Glory hallelujah! Sing it, brother!

    I had a boss (a lovely person, mind you), who regimented and regulated every aspect of her daughters’ lives. International school at $10K per year per kid. A nanny. A playroom with all educational toys. Lessons for this. Lessons for that. French AND German Immersion camp. Micromanaged microlives, never a dull moment, and never a free moment. And never a snag, hitch, upset, or disappointment. And you know what? As smart as her kids are, they’ll probably be eaten first when the real global collapse occurs.

    I’d rather play in a mud puddle with my nephews.

  2. Yay for mud puddles!

  3. I don’t believe you. If Kieren spent all his free time solving parabolic equations that described the trip around the moon, or spent every waking moment building model rockets, I think you would work 3 jobs to get him to space camp. Helping your kids pursue a passion is our job as parents. But the reality is about .1% of kids really have that sort of drive and passion for something. The parents in the article are trying to give their kids shortcuts to success, which is very different than helping them follow a passion.

  4. mud puddles, mud pies, mud baths.. YEah!

  5. OKay, maybe I would … but then I’d also make him do my chores! (I also need some good Dad-tips, Chris: what’s your policy re: chores, allowance, rewards fro grades, etc.? )

  1. Pingback: Homeschool Dads / Reading about sad, wealthy white parents makes me feel lucky

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